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A wine drawing philosopher with a heart of gold. aka. #firekitten

14 Responses

  1. katems
    katems at | | Reply

    this is really interesting. are the three semillons blended together before bottling, or are they bottled separately? the blend of the three sounds delicious, taking the very best from each way of treating the grape. yum!

    1. Hardy
      Hardy at | | Reply

      We’ve been doing blending trials with the three lots, and most likely, they are going to be combined. I think they skin fermented (both in wood and tank) and the concreted egg fermented portions can stand alone, but they both bring something to the blend. The egg is really floral, higher toned, and so delicate- The skins are the rhythm section- Having the separate lots is fascinating.

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  4. Shea
    Shea at | | Reply

    This is a superb article (and series). I’d like to know your thoughts on climatic influences and skin contact whites. In particular, how would the ripening curve impact the possibility of making good wines with skin contact? Here in B.C. there is only one producer I know of making a short skin contact Pinot Gris. I’d like to see more experimentation here as well, but wonder on the phenolics of the skin in the strange climate of the Okanagan where the ripening curve is extremely truncated.

    Also, I need to seek out more of these California wines. I’ve known of Ryme but have yet to had a chance to try it. I enjoy Pax Mahle’s skin contact Pinot Gris quite a bit.

    Also, thanks again for the Chardonnay recommendations. I have a lot of wine to taste on my next trip to SF!

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